About Quaker

Grab the energy you need any time of day.
  • base oats
  • flavored instant oats
  • ready-to-eat cereals
  • healthy snacks
  • all-in-one cereal drinks
  • oat dairy drink
  • Flavored Oats Cups
  • Chewy
  • Quaker Rolled Oats

    Boost your mornings with this delicious treat. Add toppings like fruit for extra taste.

  • Quaker instant oatmeal

    Add zest to you mornings with a quick and healthy bowl of oats. Prepared with rich tastes of maple and brown sugar.

  • Quaker quick cook oatmeal

    Ready in just a minute! Top with slices of your favourite fruit for a truly satisfying breakfast.

  • Quaker Instant Oatmeal Chocolate With Milk

    The same goodness of Quaker oats with milk but with yummy chocolate flavor.

  • Quaker instant oatmeal original with milk

    Just add water for an easy-to-prepare but loaded-with-benefits breakfast.

  • Quaker Instant Oatmeal Chocolate

    A flavor that kids will definitely love. Chocolate taste and oat goodness in one bowl.

  • Quaker Instant Oatmeal Banana and Honey

    For a sweet but healthy beginning to your day, try this Quaker Instant Oatmeal flavor.

  • Quaker Instant Oatmeal Fruit and Nuts

    Get a bowl of healthy oatmeal mixed with delicious dried fruit and nuts.

  • Quaker Instant Oatmeal Tropical Fruits

    Oats meet tropical fruity goodness in this delicious combination.

  • Quaker Instant Oatmeal Banana Bites with Inclusions

    If you love bananas, then you’ll love this flavor of instant oatmeal. Every spoonful is bliss.

  • Quaker twinkles chocolate

    Kiskstart mornings with the goodness of whole grain in a bowl of chocolatey cereal.

  • Quaker oat cookies with chocolate chips

    A nourishing snack to keep you going, with chewy raisins wedged in between.

  • QUaker oat cookies with raisins

    A nourishing snack to keep you going, with chewy raisins wedged in between

  • Quaker Oat Cookies with Apple and Cinnamon

    Bite into crunchy and wholesome cookies packed with nutrients.

  • Quaker Oat Cookies with Honey Nut

    A snack treat that’s delectable, crunchy, and (most importantly!) healthy.

  • QUAKER Oaties Chocolate Chip

    Oatmeal chocolate chip cookies that are small in size but big on nutrition.

  • Quaker Oaties Raisins

    Mini oatmeal cookies with sweet raisins. No artificial flavors added.

  • Quaker Oaties Apple and Cinnamon

    Crunchy cookie bites that will satisfy your need for delicious taste and good nutrition.

  • Quaker Oaties Honey Nuts

    Power up with bite-sized oatmeal cookies, sweetened with honey, and with bits of nuts.

  • Quaker Soft Baked Oatmeal Cookies Banana Nut

    Power your day with the new and softest Quaker Cookie ever!

  • Quaker Soft Baked Oatmeal Cookies Chocolate Almond

    Get the indulgent snack you can feel good about.

  • Quaker Instant Oats Caldo Beef and Carrots

    Try the new Quaker Instant Oats Caldo Beef and Carrots that will make your snack time healthier.

  • Quaker Instant Oats Caldo Chicken and Mushroom

    Snack on something good - try the newest product from Quaker!

  • Quaker oat cereal drink original

    Are your mornings always busy? Prepare a quick cup of Quaker Oat Cereal Drink to load up on nutrients that will get you through your day.

  • Quaker Oat Cereal Drink Chocolate

    Love the taste of chocolate? Then you’ll love this flavor of Quaker Oat Cereal Drink Chocolate flavor.

  • Quaker Good Start Banana Creme

    Grab a bottle of breakfast and add fruity power to your day!

  • Quaker Good Start Vanilla Malt

    Enjoy breakfast in a bottle in creamy Vanilla Malt!

  • Quaker Good Start Chocolate Hazelnut

    Grab a bottle of this smooth chocolate & hazelnut blend to power your day!

  • Quaker Good Start Mocha Chocolate

    Power your day with this delicious mocha chocolate kick!

  • Quaker Flavored Oats Cup Chicken and Mushroom

    Indulge in the rich, hearty taste of chicken, mushroom, and oats – in a cup! It’s filling and convenient.

  • Quaker Flavored Oats Cups Beef and Carrot

    Craving for something savory? This oats caldo is for you. It’s delicious, healthy, and made for enjoying on-the-go!

  • Quaker Flavored Oats Cups Banana Honey

    Go bananas with the sweet and healthy treat you can enjoy during your morning commute!

  • Quaker Flavored Oats Cups Chocolate

    Thick, rich chocolate meets Quaker Oats goodness – in a cup! All you have to do is add hot water!

     

  • Quaker Chewy Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip

    This granola bar is packed with good stuff – wholegrain oats, chocolate chips, and creamy peanut butter! Enjoy its chewiness any time you like!

     

  • Quaker Chewy Chocolate Chip

    We’re giving you next-level granola – made with chocolate chips. You’re welcome! Now pick it up and get going!

  • Quaker Chewy S'mores

    This granola bar’s got a chewy campfire twist — S’mores flavor from chocolate chips and chewy marshmallow bits!

  • Quaker Chewy Oatmeal Raisin

    Enjoy a chewy granola snack made with wholegrain oats and raisins. It’s a tasty treat you can enjoy wherever!

Power your day with Quaker
Oats are known as one of the supergrains because it's packed with nutrients. Hover over the icons to know the role of some of those different nutrients in your body.
Oats Have
Dietary Fibre
Supergrain Protein
Supergrain Zinc
Supergrain Iron
Quaker Oats
Supergrain vitamin B1
Supergrain Calcium

Reference:
Oats are one of the super grains*
Roger Clemens, Oats: More than just a whole grain (2014) British Journal of Nutrition Volume 112.
Supplement S2 http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0007114514002992

Breakfast
Matters

Parents prepare breakfast for their kids to give them energy and nutrients for the day. But could the most important meal of the day mean much more than that?

Watch this film to find out why breakfast matters more than you know.

It's common knowledge that oats are good for you. But not everyone knows why. Discover how oats can power your day with a healthy bundle of good nutrition.

  • What's In An Oat
  • Oats for the Family
  • Oats for the Heart
  • OATS THE SUPER GRAIN
  • Five Fast Fiber Facts
  • WHOLE GRAIN GOODNESS
  • GOODNESS OF FIBER
What's In An Oat
3/26/2015 2:00:00 PM

Everyone knows that oats are good for you. But how many people know why? Discover how oats are a bundle of nutrition just waiting to power your day.

Chew on this! Ever wonder why Quaker cookies are so perfectly rough, heavy, and slightly chewy? It's simple--you're munching on a super grain.


Every Quaker oat goes from the field to your table with all three nutritious parts of a grain kernel, making them a richer source of fiber, vitamins, and minerals. Now that's a bundle of energy--a super grain!

Oats for the Family
3/26/2015 4:14:00 PM


Good moms raise healthy-eating families. This is where Quaker comes in.

Super Grains for Breakfast

Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, whether you're a kid or a grown-up. When you're eating to get started, you want to make sure you start the right way.

A healthy breakfast helps you stay focused, boosts memory, and fuels creativity.  A meal with whole grain, such as oats, will power you with carbohydrates, protein, and fiber for long-lasting energy.

Snacking Healthier

Kids love snacks. They can't get enough of that stuff. But you have to make sure they get enough of the good stuff too--food that's low in fat, but high on nutrition.

Oats for the Heart
3/26/2015 4:23:00 PM

Oatmeal has always been one of the heart's best friends. If you want to eat healthy, you better eat oaty. But just how does Quaker promote heart health?


Oats are a good source of soluble fiber. The beta-glucan in this fiber can lower LDL - "bad" - cholesterol.


Recent studies suggest that there may be even more to the mighty, mighty oat. Phytochemicals found in oats have been observed to inhibit LDL cholesterol oxidation, while flavonoids may ultimately reduce plaque formation on artery walls.

 

OATS THE SUPER GRAIN
9/9/2016 5:00:00 AM

By Indra Balaratnam
Consultant Dietitian

Historically, oat was discovered in Egypt as early as around 2000 BC. Since then, it has been cultivated in many different regions around the world and by 1849, it was recognized as a healthy food and recommended for breakfast in the United States. Now, oats is cultivated in 42 different countries in 5 continents (1). Its versatility make it suitable for everyone in the family from babies to children, adults, the elderly, vegetarians and even those who are looking for low gluten grains. In recent years, oats has been referred to as a super grain as it is a nourishing whole grain that offers a range of health benefits.

Oats for Whole Grain Goodness

Gram for gram, all whole oat products, such as, Instant Oats, Quick Cooking Oats, Oats for Rice, Flavored Instant Oats, provides the same amount of whole grain benefits. The different size and shape of the whole oats only affects cooking time and texture!

Whole grain implies that all the 3 key parts of the grain are still intact. The intact grain layers make the grain more nutritious, and it is not surprising therefore, that the Philippines Dietary Guidelines recommend that we eat a nutritionally balanced diet with adequate grains, and at least half of our grain choices should be whole grains (2)

Each layer of the oat grain, that is, the bran, germ and endosperm provides many important nutrients:

The bran is the outermost layer of the grain. It nourishes the seed and is rich in fiber. It also contains protein and approximately 50% of the protein in oats is found in the bran layer (3). Protein is important for the growth and development of body tissues (4).

The germ is the middle layer of the grain. It is the embryo of the seed and it provides B vitamins. It is also rich in antioxidants, and contains Vitamin E and healthy fats.

The endosperm is the innermost layer of the grain. It contains a substantial amount of carbohydrates for maintaining an active lifestyle, some protein and B vitamins (3).

Oats Are Nutritious
Oats are truly nourishing and provide a bundle of nutrients:

  • CARBOHYRDRATES: To provide the fuel your body needs. Combined with protein, carbohydrates can help keep you on the go.
  • PROTEIN: To help build and maintain muscles; and support growth and development (4).
  • FIBER: Oats are rich in dietary fiber. Oats contain a considerable amount of both, insoluble and soluble fiber. Insoluble fiber increases bulk and helps support regularity and digestive function, and soluble fiber increases the feeling of fullness. Oats also contain a special type of soluble fiber beta glucan, which helps reduce blood cholesterol levels (3, 5).
  • VITAMINS: Oats are an important source of vitamins B1 and B6. Vitamin B1 helps maintain normal nerve function and energy metabolism. Vitamin B6 helps maintain function of normal immune and nervous systems (5, 6).
  • MINERALS: Oats are a source of iron, magnesium, phosphorus and zinc. Iron is an important component of hemoglobin in red blood cells. Magnesium helps maintain healthy bones and regular heartbeat. Phosphorus combines with calcium to strengthen bones and teeth. Zinc helps support growth and development and maintains normal immune function and wound healing (5, 6).


In a box…
Oats Are More Nutritious Than White Rice

When compared with white rice, gram for gram, raw oats has:

  • 1.7 Times more Protein
  • 7 Times more Fiber
  • 4 Times more Iron

AND

  • 4 Times more Magnesium

….than raw white rice (6, 7).

Replacing white rice or a porridge made with white rice, with instant or quick cooking oats; or some white rice with oats, can therefore help increase your intake of many nutrients.

Oats Offer Health Benefits
The nutrients, antioxidants and other phytochemicals in oats collectively contribute to a range of health benefits, such as:

Oats May Help Reduce Blood Cholesterol Levels
High total cholesterol is a risk factor for developing heart disease, as it clogs up arteries. Studies show that 3g to 6g of soluble fiber beta glucan daily can help reduce both total and LDL (bad) cholesterol levels considerably (8).  Oats are an important source of soluble fiber beta glucan and each 35g serving of oats - instant, quick cooking and the rolled variety, all provide approximately 1.4g of soluble fiber beta glucan. Hence, experts recommend consuming at least 70g or 10 Tbsps. of oats daily for cholesterol reduction benefits (6).

It was because of this beneficial impact of oats on cholesterol levels, that in 1997, the United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) approved the use of the health claim “foods rich in oat bran or oatmeal, in combination with a low saturated fat, and low cholesterol diet, may reduce the risk of heart disease”(8).

It is important to note that you don’t have to be a senior citizen to have high blood cholesterol levels. Excess cholesterol starts accumulating at a young age – so eating oats daily as a family is probably a good idea.

Oats May Help Reduce High Blood Pressure
High blood pressure is also another risk factor for heart disease and stroke. Oats may play a role in helping maintain blood pressure, as oats are whole grains, and many large scale studies have shown that people who eat a diet rich in whole grains are more likely to have healthy blood pressure (9-10).

The scientifically supported Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet in the U.S encourages consumption of a generous amount of whole-grain cereals along with fruits, vegetables and low fat dairy to help manage blood pressure (11).

Oats & Weight Management

OATS THE SUPER GRAIN

To manage your weight, dietitians recommend that you choose foods that not only give you energy, but keep you feeling full for longer.

Oat makes for an ideal weight management partner, as oats contain both insoluble and soluble fibers which enhance the overall feeling of fullness, when a bowl of oats is consumed (12, 13, 14).

INSOLUBLE FIBER does not dissolve in water, but it adds bulk, which increases fullness (12).

SOLUBLE FIBER dissolves in water and makes a gel that may slow down the movement of food from the stomach to the intestine, and this contributes to a feeling of fullness (13, 14).  The soluble fiber in oats is called Beta-glucan. 

Cooking oats in a liquid is advisable, as it makes oats more filling than cold, dry ready-to-eat cereals (15).

Oats & Digestive health
Oats is a fiber-rich food that bulks up your stools and promotes regular bowel movements (16).

Oats A Beneficial Addition for Everyone
Oats are truly a nutritious food for all age groups. Children, adults, and the elderly, can all benefit from the whole grain goodness of and nutrients in oats. Additionally, oats offer many health benefits ranging from cholesterol reduction, to a lower blood pressure and better digestive health and regularity. Hence, it is important to consider adding oats into the family’s daily diet.

Following are some delicious oatsome ideas to help you fit oats into your daily meals:

  • Cook it into a hearty porridge with a variety of flavours. You can give it a touch of sweetness with fruit and nuts, or make it savoury with meat and vegetables.
  • Blend low fat milk, yogurt, fruit and instant oats to make a creamy smoothie.
  • Use oats instead of white flour when making pancakes, fritters, muffins, cakes or cookies, to boost up the fiber content.
  • Use oats to coat meats, and bake it for a healthier crispy wholegrain crumb.
  • Add quick cooking oats into the rice that you are cooking.
  • Sprinkle instant oats into a hot beverage for a wholesome filling snack.
  • Snack on healthier eats such as granola bars, oat cookies, a cereal powder drink or a small bowl of sweet or savoury instant oats.


References:

1. Gibson L and Benson G. Origin, History and Uses of Oat (Avena sativa) and Wheat (Triticum aestivum). January 2002. Retrieved from http://agron-www.agron.iastate.edu/Courses/agron212/Readings/ Oat_wheat_history.htm

2. Promoting Good Nutrition and Healthy Diet. Retrieved on 18th Jan, 2016 from      http://www.wpro.who.int/philippines/publications/module3.pdf

3. The Whole Grain – Greater Than the Sum of its Parts. 2012. Retrieved from http://www.quakeroats.com/Libraries/pdf/The_Whole_Grain_Greater_than_the_Sum_of_its_Parts.sflb.ashx

4. American Dietetic Association. Nutrition fact sheet – Go with whole grains for fiber. 2004. Retrieved from http://www.ci.st-joseph.mo.us/parks/Images/Senior_ Tips/ fiber.pdf

5. Blake JS. Nutrition and You. Boston: Pearson, 2012. Book.

6. Nutrition Analysis of Quick Cooking Oats and Instant Oats.

7. USDA, National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Release 28. Rice, white, long-grain, regular, raw, unenriched, 20444. Retrieved from http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/6613?fgcd=Cereal+Grains+and+Pasta&manu=&lfacet=&format=&count=&max=35&offset=105&sort=&qlookup=

8. 21 CFR 101.81 Health Claims: Soluble Fiber from Certain Foods and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD). U.S Food and Drug Administration. May 2011. Retrieved from http://www.fda.gov/Food/LabelingNutrition/Label Claims /Health ClaimsMeetingSignificantScientificAgreementSSA/default.htm.

9. Jacobs JR DR, Meyer KA, Kushi LH and Folsom AR. Whole-grain intake may reduce the risk of ischemic heart disease death in postmenopausal women: the Iowa Women's Health Study. Am J Clin Nutr 1998; 68, 248-257.

10. Steffen LM, Kroenke CH, Yu X, Pereira MA, Slattery ML, Horn LV, Gross MD and Jacobs Jr D. Associations of plant food, dairy product, and meat intakes with 15-y incidence of elevated blood pressure in young black and white adults: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults. Am J Clin Nutr 2005; 82:1169 –77.

11. Sacks FM, Obarzanek E, Windhauser MM, Svetkey LP, Vollmer WM, McCullough M, Karanja N, Lin PH, Steele P, Proschan MA. Rationale and design of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension trial (DASH). A multicenter controlled-feeding study of dietary patterns to lower blood pressure. 1995 Mar;5(2):108-18.

12. Samra RA and Anderson GH. Insoluble cereal fiber reduces appetite and short-term food intake and glycemic response to food consumed 75 min later by healthy men. Am J Clin Nutr. 2007; 86(4): 972-979.

13. Kristensen M and Jensen MG. Dietary fibers in the regulation of appetite and food intake. Importance of viscosity. 2011 Feb;56(1):65-70.doi:10.1016/j.appet. 2010.11.147. Epub 2010 Nov 27.

14. Wanders AJ, van den Borne JJGC, de Graaf C, Hulshof T, Jonathan MC, Kristensen M, Mars M, Schols HA, Feskens EJM. Effects of dietary fiber on subjective appetite, energy intake and body weight: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Obesity Rev 2011; 12: 724-39.

15. Rebello CJ, Johnson W, Martin C, Bordenave N, Klinken BWV, O’Shea M, Chu Y and Greenway F. Effect of Two Oat-based Breakfast Cereals on Appetite, Satiety, and Food Intake. FASEB J. April 2013; 27:126.4

16. Berti C, Riso P, Brusamolino A, Porrini M. Effect on appetite control of minor cereal and pseudo cereal products. Br J Nutr 2005. Nov; 94(5):850-8.

 

 

Five Fast Fiber Facts
7/27/2015 4:00:00 AM

It's good for your gut - the fiber found in all-natural Quaker Oats promotes normal laxation and the growth of beneficial bacteria.

It fights excess fat - Fiber can increase the feeling of fullness and decrease the feeling of hunger, leading to weight loss benefits.

It lowers the risk of diabetes - A higher fiber intake (like one full of Quaker Power Meals!) is associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes.

It could keep cancer away - Studies show that incidence of colorectal cancer can be reduced 40% by doubling fiber intake.

It can also be delicious! - Quaker makes getting your daily fiber easy with the all-new Good Start Oat Dairy Drink, easy and tasty Quaker Power Meals, classic Quaker Oats, and other great oat ideas!

WHOLE GRAIN GOODNESS
9/9/2016 6:00:00 AM

By Indra Balaratnam

Consultant Dietitian

Daily Nutritional Guide Pyramid for Filipino Adults (1)

 

Daily Nutritional Guide Pyramid for Filipino Adults (1)


The Philippines Dietary Guidelines recommend the consumption of 5 to 8 servings of grains daily. In addition, the guidelines also recommend the intake of at least 50 percent of whole grains (1).   Grains such as oats, whole wheat, brown rice, barley, corn and millet are some examples of wholegrains.  So what is a wholegrain? Simply put, a wholegrain is a grain in which all 3 edible layers of the grain are intact:

  • The bran layer is the coarse outermost part. It is where most of the fiber of the grain is and it is rich in B vitamins, antioxidants, phytonutrients, iron, zinc, copper and magnesium.
  • The endosperm is the large middle part of the grain. It contains most of the carbohydrate and proteins of the grain.
  • The germ is the inner core. It provides antioxidants, Vitamin E, B vitamins and healthy oils (2).


Whole grains are also a source of many other beneficial components or phytochemicals (3, 4); and a majority of these beneficial components are present in the bran and germ fractions of whole grains (5).

As the bran and germ layers are removed during the milling process, refined grains like white rice and products made from refined grains like white flour and white bread lose out on the nutrients and beneficial components in the bran and germ. It is not surprising therefore that health authorities and the dietary guidelines globally recommend an intake of whole grains instead of refined grains.

Going beyond natural goodness, health experts also recommend the intake of whole grains, as whole grains can help reduce the risk of heart disease, cancer, type 2 diabetes; and may even contribute to better weight maintenance (2). Also, it is important to note, that while these benefits were observed with an intake of at least 3 servings of whole grains daily, a reduction in risk of chronic diseases has also been observed with a daily intake of even 1 serving of whole grains (2). So you could say – every grain of whole grain in your diet is important!

Whole Grains And Heart Disease
An inverse association has been observed between whole grain intake and heart disease. This benefit is not only due to the soluble fiber and its cholesterol-reduction properties in some whole grains like oats and barley, but it is also due to other natural components in whole grains, such as polyphenols, phytonutrients, polysaccharides and lignans which work together to offer a range of heart health benefits (6-9).

Whole Grains And Cancer
Whole grain intake is inversely linked with the relative risk of certain cancers (10, 11). The presence of certain dietary components including fiber, resistant starch, oligosaccharides, phytochemicals, antioxidant vitamins, and minerals in whole grains are believed to contribute to this a lower risk of cancer (3).

Whole Grains And Type 2 Diabetes
Lifestyle modifications and weight control are major factors in the prevention and treatment of diabetes. In terms of diet, a high consumption of whole grains, legumes, fruits, vegetables, seafood, white meat, nuts, and vegetable oils, was linked with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes (10).

Researchers believe that this beneficial effect of whole grains may be due to the structure of whole grains and the nutrients found in whole grains, such as dietary magnesium and antioxidants like vitamin E, phytic acid, and selenium (11).

Whole Grains And Weight Maintenance
Over the years, it has been observed that whole grain consumers consistently weighed less than those who consumed fewer whole grain foods (12). Intake of at least 3 servings of whole grains daily was linked with reduced risk of obesity (13). In addition, a lower BMI, waist-hip ratio, waist circumference (14) and a lower level of abdominal fat (15) has also been observed with an increase in whole grain intake.

Some experts believe that this weight maintenance benefit could be due to the fact that whole grains are rich in dietary fiber and as fiber makes the food more filling, people are more likely to feel satisfied with less food (16-18) and eat less.


WHOLE GRAIN GOODNESS

Top Box
Whole grain recommendations:
While scientists and health experts recommend three or more servings of whole grains daily for optimum health benefits, every bit of whole grain you eat can get you on a road to better health. So start slowly and gradually replace refined grains with whole grains and in time, you will actually begin to appreciate the nuttier taste of whole grains (2).

What makes a serving of whole grains?
A Serving of 100% Whole Grain Foods is defined as any of the following:

  • 1/2 cup cooked brown rice or other cooked whole grain
  • 1/2 cup cooked 100% whole grain pasta or noodles
  • 1/2 cup cooked hot whole grain cereal, such as oatmeal
  • 1 ounce uncooked whole grain pasta, brown rice or other whole grain
  • 1 slice 100% whole grain bread
  • 1 very small (1 oz.) 100% whole grain muffin
  • 1 cup 100% whole grain ready-to-eat cereal


In case of whole grain foods made with a combination of ingredients like whole wheat bread, crackers, granola bars etc. 16g of whole grains is equal to a serving of whole grains (2).

The table below lists the Quaker range of whole grain foods and whole grain servings (based on 16 grams of whole grains per serving):

Food Products

 

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain Content Per Serve

 

 

 

 

 

Whole Grains Servings Per Serve

 

 

 

 

 

Quaker Instant Oatmeal

 

 

 

 

 

35g/35g Serve

 

 

 

 

 

2 Servings

(Makes 1 cup cooked oats)

 

 

 

 

 

Quaker Quick Cook Oatmeal

 

 

 

 

 

35g/35g Serve

 

 

 

 

 

2 Servings

(Makes 1 cup cooked oats)

 

 

 

 

 

Quaker Rolled Oats

 

 

 

 

 

40g/40g Serve

 

 

 

 

 

2 Servings

(Makes 1 cup cooked oats)

 

 

 

 

 

Quaker Instant Oatmeal- Banana and Honey

 

 

 

 

 

23.3g/33g Serve

 

 

 

 

 

1.5 Servings

 

 

 

 

 

Quaker Instant Oatmeal- Chocolate

 

 

 

 

 

23.6g/33g Serve

 

 

 

 

 

1.5 Servings

 

 

 

 

 

Quaker Instant Oatmeal with Milk-Original

 

 

 

 

 

26.4g/40g Serve

 

 

 

 

 

1.7 Servings

 

 

 

 

 

Quaker Instant Oatmeal with Milk-Chocolate

 

 

 

 

 

25.4g/40g Serve

 

 

 

 

 

1.6 Servings

 

 

 

 

 

Quaker Instant Oatmeal-Fruit and Nuts

 

 

 

 

 

19.2g/35g Serve

 

 

 

 

 

1.2 Servings

 

 

 

 

 

Quaker Instant Oatmeal-Banana Bites

 

 

 

 

 

22g/35g Serve

 

 

 

 

 

1.4 Servings

 

 

 

 

 

Quaker Instant Oatmeal- Tropical Fruits

 

 

 

 

 

22g/35g Serve

 

 

 

 

 

1.4 Servings

 

 

 

 

 

Quaker Instant Multigrain Porridge- Chicken & Mushroom

 

 

 

 

 

14.9g/28g Serve

 

 

 

 

 

0.9 Servings

 

 

 

 

 

Quaker Instant Multigrain Porridge- Beef & Carrot

 

 

 

 

 

14.9g/28g Serve

 

 

 

 

 

0.9 Servings

 

 

 

 

 

Quaker Oat Cereal Drink-Original

 

 

 

 

 

8.7g/29g Serve

 

 

 

 

 

0.5 Servings

 

 

 

 

 

Quaker Oat Cereal Drink-Chocolate

 

 

 

 

 

6.7g/29g Serve

 

 

 

 

 

0.4 Servings

 

 

 

 

 

Quaker Oat Cookies-Raisins

 

 

 

 

 

7.4g /27g Serve

 

 

 

 

 

0.4 Servings

 

 

 

 

 

Quaker Oat Cookies-Honey Nuts

 

 

 

 

 

7.4g /27g Serve

 

 

 

 

 

0.4 Servings

 

 

 

 

 

Quaker Oat Cookies-Apple and Cinnamon

 

 

 

 

 

7.5g /27g Serve

 

 

 

 

 

0.4 Servings

 

 

 

 

 

Quaker Oat Cookies-Chocolate Chips

 

 

 

 

 

7.2g /27g Serve

 

 

 

 

 

0.4 Servings

 

 

 

 

 

Quaker Good Start-Banana Creme

 

 

 

 

 

8.07g/280ml

 

 

 

 

 

0.5 Servings

 

 

 

 

 

Quaker Good Start-Vanilla Malt

 

 

 

 

 

8.07g/280ml

 

 

 

 

 

0.5 Servings

 

 

 

 

 

 
Selecting Whole Grains
While it is easy to select individual whole grains, it can be more difficult to identify whole grains in packaged foods. To ensure the food you are selecting is whole grain based or contains adequate whole grains, read the ingredient list. If a whole grain is listed first in the ingredient list, the food is definitely a whole grain based food (2).

Here are some awesome ways to eat more wholegrains every day:

  1. Replace at least half of the flour in your favourite baking recipe with wholegrain flour or instant oats ground to a flour.
  2. Make a hearty warm oat porridge with low fat milk, dried fruit and nuts; or make a savoury porridge with meat and vegetables.
  3. Blend wholegrains like instant oats with chilled milk, yogurt and fresh fruit to make a delicious smoothie.
  4. For a snack, spread wholegrain crackers with peanut butter, jam or cheese.
  5. Use wholemeal bread to make sandwiches or french toast.
  6. Wholegrain cereals or oats make a great crumb coating for baked chicken or fish nuggets.
  7. Add wholegrain cereal into your hot beverages to boost the nutrition and fiber content.
  8. Add oats into minced meat to make cutlets or meat loaf.
  9. Make a fried rice with brown rice, chicken, egg whites and vegetables.
  10. Toss up whole wheat noodles with vegetables and meat for a healthy one-dish meal.


PICTORIAL

Cooked oats with low fat milk topped with fresh fruit.

2 slices of whole wheat bread made into a sandwich with either tuna/egg/chicken filling with some sliced tomatoes.

Smoothie made with instant oats, low fat milk or yogurt and fresh fruit.

Home cooked fried rice made with brown rice, some cubed meat and assorted vegetables.


REFERENCES:

1. Promoting Good Nutrition and Healthy Diet. Retrieved on 18th Jan, 2016 from      http://www.wpro.who.int/philippines/publications/module3.pdf

2. Whole Grain 101. What are the Health Benefits? Retrieved from http://wholegrainscouncil.org/whole-grains-101/what-are-the-health-benefits

3. Okarter N, Liu RH. Health benefits of whole grain phytochemicals. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2010 Mar; 50(3):193-208. doi: 10.1080/10408390802248734.

4. Liu RH. Potential synergy of phytochemicals in cancer prevention: mechanism of action. J Nutr. 2004 Dec; 134(12 Suppl):3479S-3485S.

5. Adom KK, Sorrells ME, Liu RH. Phytochemicals and antioxidant activity of milled fractions of different wheat varieties. J Agric Food Chem. 2005 Mar 23; 53(6):2297-306.

6. Jacobs DR, Meyer KA, Kushi LH, Folsom AR. Whole-grain intake may reduce the risk of ischemic heart disease death in postmenopausal women: the Iowa Women’s Health Study. Am J Clin Nutr. 1998 Aug; 68(2):248-57.

7. Liu S, Stampfer MJ, Hu FB, Giovannucci E, Rimm E, Manson JE, Hennekens CH, Willett WC. Whole-grain consumption and risk of coronary heart disease: results from the Nurses’ Health Study. Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Sep; 70(3):412-9.

8. Anderson JW. Whole grains protect against atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Proc Nutr Soc. 2003 Feb; 62(1):135-42.

9. Mellen PB, Walsh TF, Herrington DM. Whole grain intake and cardiovascular disease: a meta-analysis. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2008 May; 18(4):283-90. Epub 2007 Apr 20.

10. Chatenoud L, Tavani A, La Vecchia C, Jacobs DR Jr, Negri E, Levi F, Franceschi S. Whole grain food intake and cancer risk. Int J Cancer. 1998 Jul 3; 77(1):24-8.

11. Schatzkin A, Mouw T, Park Y, Subar AF, Kipnis V, Hollenbeck A, Leitzmann MF, Thompson FE. Dietary fiber and whole-grain consumption in relation to colorectal cancer in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 May; 85(5):1353-60.

12. Koh-Banerjee P, Franz M, Sampson L, Liu S, Jacobs DR Jr, Spiegelman D, Willett W, Rimm E. Changes in whole-grain, bran, and cereal fiber consumption in relation to 8-y weight gain among men. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Nov; 80(5):1237-45.

13. Harland JI, Garton LE. Whole-grain intake as a marker of healthy body weight and adiposity. Public Health Nutr. 2008 Jun;11(6):554-63. Epub 2007 Nov 16.

14. Newby PK, Maras J, Bakun P, Muller D, Ferrucci L, Tucker KL. Intake of whole grains, refined grains, and cereal fiber measured with 7-d diet records and associations with risk factors for chronic disease. Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Dec;86(6):1745-53.

15. Esmaillzadeh A, Mirmiran P, Azizi F. Whole-grain intake and the prevalence of hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype in Tehranian adults. Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Jan; 81(1):55-63.

16. Schroeder N, Gallaher DD, Arndt EA, Marquart L. Influence of whole grain barley, whole grain wheat, and refined rice-based foods on short-term satiety and energy intake. Appetite. 2009 Dec; 53(3):363-9. doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2009.07.019. Epub 2009 Jul 28.

17. Berti C, Riso P, Brusamolino A, Porrini M. Effect on appetite control of minor cereal and pseudocereal products. Br J Nutr. 2005 Nov; 94(5):850-8.

18. Holt SH, Brand-Miller JC, Stitt PA. The effects of equal-energy portions of different breads on blood glucose levels, feelings of fullness and subsequent food intake. J Am Diet Assoc. 2001 Jul; 101(7):767-73.

GOODNESS OF FIBER
9/9/2016 6:30:00 AM

By Indra Balaratnam
Consultant Dietitian

Fiber is a form of carbohydrate that cannot be fully digested. It is found naturally in plant foods such as whole grains, fruits, vegetables, beans, nuts and seeds. (1). Eating a high fiber diet may help: lower blood cholesterol levels, ease constipation and improve gut health, support weight management and help manage blood sugar levels (2).

There are 2 types of dietary fiber which are important for your health (2): insoluble fiber and soluble fiber

Insoluble fiber
does not digest fully in the body. It eventually forms roughage to bulk up your stools and regulates bowel movements. Insoluble fiber is found in the bran part of the oat grain and other whole grains, the stem part of vegetables, and nuts (2).

Soluble fiber
, on the other hand, dissolves or swells up in water to form a gummy textured ball. Oats and other grains (including rice and corn), beans, vegetables, fruits and psyllium seeds are high in soluble fiber (2). The main soluble fiber in oats is called beta glucan.

Whole grains, vegetables, fruits, legumes (dried beans, peas, lentils), nuts and seeds are excellent sources of dietary fiber (1).

Fiber may also be added as an ingredient in processed foods. Some commonly added functional fibers include non-digestible plant fibers (e.g. resistant starch, pectins, gums), animal fibers (e.g. chitin and chitosan), or commercially produced or extracted carbohydrates (e.g. resistant starch, polydextrose, inulin, non-digestible oligosaccharides including fructo and galacto-oligosaccharides and indigestible dextrins) (3). The best way to identify the type of fiber, is to read the ingredient list on the food package.

Oats vs. White Rice
If you compare oats and white rice gram for gram, oats have 7 times more fiber than white rice. A 100 gram serving of oats contains 10.6 grams of fiber (4). 25g of fiber is recommended daily for adults (5).   So, if you think about it, you can easily get more fiber than you need in your daily diet, just by replacing white rice or rice porridge with either instant or quick cooking oats or Quaker Oats For Rice.

Health Benefits of Fiber
A high fiber diet, when consumed as part of an overall healthy lifestyle, offers numerous health benefits:

May Lower Blood Cholesterol Levels
High cholesterol is a risk factor for heart disease. The soluble fiber, beta gluten, in oats helps lower total and LDL (bad) cholesterol, without reducing HDL (good) cholesterol that is needed by your body.  Studies show that eating 3g to 6g of soluble fiber beta glucan every day is beneficial, when consumed as part of a diet that is low in saturated fat and cholesterol. You can get the daily minimum required 3g of soluble fiber beta glucan from 70 grams or 10 heaped tablespoons of instant, quick cooking oats or rolled oats(4).  This makes oats an ideal food choice for those who want to reduce their blood cholesterol levels and maintain heart health. It is for this reason, that the US Food and Drug Administration approved the use of the health claim statement “eating 3 grams of soluble fiber beta glucan, as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol helps reduce the risk for heart disease (6)”.

Ease Constipation & Improve Gut Health
If you have 3 or less bowel movements in a week that means you are constipated (7). Eating sufficient insoluble fiber in your daily diet can help bulk up your stools, making bowel movements regular and easier (8, 9). This helps prevent constipation and hemorrhoids too.

Additionally, functional fibers such as inulin or fructo-oligosaccharides , galacto-oligosaccharides, arabinogalactans  (1,10), and polydextrose (10) are prebiotic fibers, that is, they serve as a substrate for intestinal bacteria , and promote the growth of beneficial bacteria (1).  Polydextrose consumption for example, promotes the growth of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria (10).

May Help Support Weight Management
A large scale study in the US demonstrated that women who consumed more fiber weighed less than women who consumed less fiber, and women with the highest fiber intakes had the lowest risk of major weight gain (11). 

Experts believe that this beneficial impact of fiber on weight management may be due to the fact that dietary fiber intake promotes satiety and a feeling of fullness and hence decreases hunger (12, 13).

Oat makes for an ideal weight management partner, as oats contain both insoluble and soluble fibers which enhance the overall feeling of fullness, when a bowl of oats is consumed (14, 15, 16). 

SOLUBLE FIBER dissolves in water and makes a gel that may slow down the movement of food and nutrients from the stomach to the intestine, and this contributes to a feeling of fullness (15, 16).  The soluble fiber in oats is called Beta-glucan. 

Cooking oats in a liquid is advisable, as it more easily hydrates the soluble fiber beta-glucan making these oats more filling than the oat in ready-to-eat cereals in cold milk (17).

Manage Blood Sugar Levels
When viscous fibers like the soluble fibers in oats are added to the diet, the rate at which food is digested and glucose is released into the blood stream slows down (18). This may help support better blood sugar management in individuals with diabetes provided the overall carbohydrate intake in the meal is not excessive.

GOODNESS OF FIBER

Fiber – The Daily Recommendations
Health authorities in the Philippines recommend consuming 20g to 25g of fiber daily (19).

If you don’t eat much fiber, now is the time to see fiber in a new light and consider improving your diet, to avail of the health benefits of fiber.

(Graphic on Pg 6 & 7 of the Fiber Facts Booklet)

1 serving Quaker Instant Oatmeal (35g)

1 medium banana (118g)

4 slices whole wheat bread (4g each)

½ cup baked beans (127g)

1 small apple (149g)

3.4g fiber

3.1g

7.6g

5.2g

3.6g

TOTAL: 22.9 g of fiber per day
 

1 Serving of Quaker Instant Oats Caldo Chicken & Mushroom Flavor (28g)

 

1 small guava (150g)

1 cup cooked brown rice (195g)

1 cup steamed corn kernel (165g)

1 small pear (148g)

1.4g fiber

8.1g

3.5g

4g

4.6g

TOTAL: 21.6g of fiber per day

1 Bottle Quaker Good Start Oat Dairy Drink (280ml)

1 cup pineapple chunks (165g)

2 cups cooked brown rice (390g)

1 cup boiled green peas (145g)

¼ cup peanuts (3g)

4.6 g

2.3g

7g

7.4g

3.1g

 TOTAL: 24.4g of fiber per day

Note: Fiber levels have been taken from the USDA National Nutrient Database. http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/search (20).

Oatsome ways to incorporate fiber into your meals are:

  • Replace up to 1/3 of baking flour in a recipe with instant or quick cooking oats.
  • Add ¾ cup of oats to every 500g of minced meat when making your cutlets, meatballs or homemade burgers.
  • Use oat crumb coating for your foods and desserts.
  • Stir oats into yogurt and fruit and soak it overnight for a wholesome ready-to-eat breakfast.
  • Stir in instant plain or flavored instant oats into hot low fat milk for a deliciously thick beverage.
  • Snack on oat cookies, oat cereal bars or oat-based cereal or savory oats.

References:

  1. Blake, Joan Salge. Nutrition & You. Boston: PEARSON. 2012. Page 252. Book
  2. Schiff, Wendy. Nutrition For Healthy Living. McGraw Hill International Edition. 2009. Page 132. Book
  3. Position of the American Dietetic Association: Health Implications of Dietary Fiber. J Am Diet Assoc. 2008;108:1716-1731
  4. USDA Nutrient Database. http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/
  5. Nutrient Reference Value For Nutrition Labeling Purposes. Decree of Head of National Agency for Drug and Food Control Indonesia No. HK.00.05.52.6291, dated 9 August 2007.
  6. 21 CFR 101.81 Health Claims: Soluble Fiber From Certain Foods and Risk of Coronory Heart Disease (CHD). (2011, May 1). US Food and Drug Administration. Retrieved from http://www.fda.gov/Food/Labeling Nutrition/LabelClaims/HealthClaimsMeetingSignificantScientificAgreementSSA/default.htm

    Health Claim: “Soluble fiber from oatmeal, as part of a low saturated fat, low cholesterol diet, may reduce the risk of heart disease.”

  7. Lederle FA, Busch DL, Mattox KM, West MJ, Aske DM. Cost-effective treatment of constipation in the elderly: A randomized double-blind comparison of sorbitol and lactulose. Am J Med. 1990;89:597-601
  8. Haack VS, Chesters JG, Vollendorf NW, Story JA, Marlett JA. Increasing amounts of dietary fiber provided by foods normalizes physiologic response of the large bowel without altering calcium balance or fecal steroid excretion. Am J Clin Nutr. 1998;68: 615-622.
  9. Southgate DAT, Durnin JVGA. Calorie conversion factors. An experimental reassessment of the factors used in the calculation of the energy value of human diets. Br J Nutr. 1970;24:517-535.
  10. Joanne Slavin.  Fiber and Prebiotics: Mechanisms and Health Benefits.  Nutrients 2013, 5, 1417-1435; doi:10.3390/nu5041417
  11. Liu S, Willett WC, Manson JE, Hu FB, Rosner B, Colditz G. Relation between changes in intakes of dietary fiber and grain products and changes in weight and development of obesity among middle-aged women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2003;87:920-927.
  12. Slavin JL, Green H. Fiber and satiety. Nutr Bull. 2007;32(suppl 1):32-42.Heaton KW. Food fiber as an obstacle to energy intake. Lancet. 1973;2:1418-1421.
  13. Heaton KW. Food fiber as an obstacle to energy intake. Lancet. 1973;2:1418-1421.
  14.  Samra RA and Anderson GH. Insoluble cereal fiber reduces appetite and short-term food intake and glycemic response to food consumed 75 min later by healthy men. Am J Clin Nutr. 2007; 86(4): 972-979.
  15.  Kristensen M and Jensen MG. Dietary fibres in the regulation of appetite and food intake. Importance of viscosity. 2011 Feb;56(1):65-70.doi:10.1016/j.appet. 2010.11.147. Epub 2010 Nov 27.
  16.  Wanders AJ, van den Borne JJGC, de Graaf C, Hulshof T, Jonathan MC, Kristensen M, Mars M, Schols HA, Feskens EJM. Effects of dietary fibre on subjective appetite, energy intake and body weight: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Obesity Rev 2011; 12: 724-39.
  17.  Rebello CJ, Johnson W, Martin C, Bordenave N, Klinken BWV, O’Shea M, Chu Y and Greenway F. Effect of Two Oat-based Breakfast Cereals on Appetite, Satiety, and Food Intake. FASEB J. April 2013; 27:126.4
  18. Regand A1, Tosh SMWolever TMWood PJ. Physicochemical properties of beta-glucan in differently processed oat foods influence glycemic response.
  19. .The 2015 Recommended Energy and Nutrient Intakes (RENI). The DOST recommendation for fibre for adult (19 years and above) is 20g to 25g.
  20. Fiber levels have been taken from the USDA National Nutrient Database. http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/search (20).


For over 130 years, we've been inspired by the power and wholesome goodness of the amazing oat. See how much we've grown with it.
1850

Ferdinand Schumacher founds German Mills American Cereal Company in Akron, OH. During the same period, John Stuart established the North Star Mills Company in Canada.

1877

Quaker Oats registered as the first trademark for a breakfast cereal. The trademark was registered with the U.S. Patent Office as "a figure of a man in 'Quaker garb'" Both former owners, Henry Seymour and William Heston, claimed to have selected the Quaker name as a symbol of good quality and honest value.

1881

Henry Parsons Crowell buys the bankrupt Quaker Mill in Ravenna, OH, and its most important asset - brand name Quaker

1882

Crowell launches the first national magazine advertising program for a breakfast cereal.

1890

The American Cereal Company runs a special all-Quaker Oats train from Cedar Rapids, IA to Portland, OR and introduces the first ever "trial-size samples." 1/2 oz. sample boxes of Quaker Oats are delivered to every mailbox in Portland, OR.

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1891

Two more firsts – Quaker Oats introduced the idea of packaged premiums by inserting chinaware items into boxes of oats, plus we became the first brand to feature a recipe on its box (the recipe was for Oatmeal Bread).

1908

Oat Cakes become the first oatmeal cookie to appear on the Quaker Oats package.

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1915

The familiar round Quaker Oats package is introduced.

1922

Quaker introduces Quaker Quick Oats, one of the first convenience products.

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1961

Life® Cereal is introduced in its original flavor.

1966

Quaker Instant Oatmeal is introduced.

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1970

The first flavored instant oatmeal is introduced – Maple & Brown Sugar is distributed nationally and Date & Brown Sugar is distributed regionally.

1981

Quaker introduces the world to chewy granola bars with Quaker Chewy®.

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1995

The Quaker Oats Company submits a heart health petition to the FDA for consideration.

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1996

The FDA issues a proposal for the first health claim for a specific food – oatmeal for heart health.

1997

The first food-specific health claim for oatmeal is approved by the FDA. The new heart health claim appears on Quaker Oatmeal cereals which qualify. The claim reads: "Soluble fiber from oatmeal as part of a low saturated fat, low cholesterol diet, may reduce the risk of heart disease." This was also the first year of the Smart Heart Challenge.

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2007

Quaker celebrates our 130-year anniversary.

2012

The famous Quaker man (affectionately known as Larry) undergoes a subtle makeover-including getting back in shape by eating right and exercising, trimming his famous coif and revealing more radiant skin from daily oatmeal masks.

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